Home 2017-06-25T16:25:13+00:00

Support for your aging loved ones

If you are searching for support for caring for aging parents, help with Alzheimer’s, nursing homes, caregivers for the elderly, home care for aging parents at home, and elder abuse, then you have come to the right place.  You most likely know just how overwhelming and complex the journey can be.

From poorly qualified advisers to home care agencies and nursing homes that are more interested in increasing their profits instead of serving your needs, the pitfalls can lead to decisions that create frustration and unnecessary expense and put your loved one at risk.

Since January 2006, Arizona Elder Care, LLC has been providing professional care management in Sedona, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona. We help our clients navigate the complex maze of choices to assist them in making informed decisions about senior care.

We provide a safety net so that you can be assured.

Arizona Elder Care, LLC

Who We Are:

Arizona Elder Care, LLC helps families with the challenges of caring for aging parents and loved ones, those suffering from Alzheimer’s,  assistance with home care and nursing homes.

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What We Do:

Arizona Elder Care, LLC specializes in geriatric care management, fiduciary services, medication management and benefits planning.

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Where We Work:

Arizona Elder Care, LLC has offices in both Sedona and Prescott while also serving the communities in the Verde Valley and Flagstaff.

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Our Affiliations

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QUESTIONS ABOUT HOW TO CARE FOR AGING LOVED ONES?

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What To Do Next

  • If you are in crisis and need immediate assistance, call us at 928.639.1583 or 928.445.6000.
  • To contact us by email: Click here.
  • If your needs do not require immediate attention, or you are only beginning to educate yourself about this topic, please review our Resources section for a wealth of valuable information.

Helpful Articles

  • Light therapy for dementia

New Light into Dementia

There is a new light into dementia. We already know that music helps soothe those suffering from dementia by helping them reconnect with the person they used to be by triggering memory. This video from a New Zealand rest home shows how light therapy can make a difference as well – both for those suffering from dementia and their loved ones who witness the results – the presence of their remembered loved one for a few moments and not just a shell of who they once were. (It is worth waiting for the ad to finish to view this lovely story.)

Man with Parkinson’s Loses Symptoms While Playing Piano

This beautiful story is about an accomplished pianist  diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease. As a young man, Lucien Leinfelder had studied music at Julliard and played professionally with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. At 82, Lucien Leinfelder was suffering from a severe case of Parkinson’s disease. Fortunately, he loses his symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease while playing the piano. Here is the link to his story and video.

We have learned through the Music and Memory program, which we have implemented with many of our clients, the impact of music on those suffering from Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia. It reminds us of who we used to be when we listen to music that triggers memories from our past. It isn’t just listening to music that reminds us, it can also be playing a musical instrument.

One of our clients suffering from late stage dementia was an accomplished horn player. He performed in bands much of his life. Although he has now lost the capacity to play, when he puts the mouthpiece from his horn (no longer attached to the musical instrument) between his lips, he is given a respite from the symptoms which currently consume him and he comes alive.

Any respite from the symptoms of Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and dementia is a wonderful thing.

  • Alzheimer's Every Minute Counts

Alzheimer’s Most Costly Disease in Medical History

Forbes magazine calls Alzheimer’s the most costly disease in medical history.

  • Taking Care of Aging Parents and the couch on fire

Taking Care of Aging Parents: Couch on Fire

When our social worker Ron meets with new clients, he discusses how our aging parents view adult children. They see them as the kid who crashed their car, or borrowed money and didn’t pay it back, or whined when things got too hard. When the time comes, taking care of aging parents becomes difficult when they still view us with the baggage from raising us.  They may brag about our accomplishments to their friends but they don’t see us as grown up enough to help take care of them.

Both Ron and I have experienced this as well with our own parents recently.  Even though we have been running a Geriatric Care Management practice for the past decade and Ron has a master’s degree and license in Social Work, we are still “children” to them and not the professionals that they want to listen to.  And our aging parents have that right, after all, they still have capacity and they still have the right to make their own decisions, whether we personally deem them “good” or “bad” decisions.  Taking care of our aging parents isn’t easy for us either.

Ron was recently in Dallas dealing with a health emergency with his Mom. One of the first things he did was interview local Geriatric Care Managers, also known as Care Experts, or Aging Life Care Professionals as they have recently re-branded themselves. He knows in his experience that our aging parents will more likely listen to a professional about where they will receive the best medical care, or hiring a caregiver 24/7 upon hospital discharge for the first week at home will be a good investment in their post-surgical recovery, or it really is okay to ask the doctor/hospitalist/surgeon lots of questions.  It sounds way better coming from a “professional” than the son who burned down their living room couch as a teenager.

Hiring an Aging Life Care Professional in Dallas will also allow Ron to come home to Arizona after the crisis has been managed.  His Dallas colleague will provide any needed oversight or guidance that his parents may need, while giving us the confidence that their needs during this current health emergency will be addressed even if Ron can’t return to Dallas right away. And once this crisis has passed, the local Aging Life Care Professional, will be a safety net for us, someone to call when the next crisis happens until he has time to get back on the airplane to Dallas.